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Music

Irene Logan – Kabilla



It looks likes the pretty songstress, Irene Logan is bent on satisfying the whole nation by singing a song at least in all the major languages of Ghana. To my surprise, she’s doing it and doing it quiet well, A Native of Liberia, Irene has lived most of her life in Ghana. Daughter of Liberian Parents Her father and brother died when she was virtually growing. Upon moving to Ghana, her mother got married to a Ghanaian. She grew up surrounded by music, a sphere of soul and pop, her step-dad a guitarist and singer while her mother sang professionally too. She held a microphone as early as age 3. Her experience with the mic came so natural that people around knew by intuition that she will be great.At age 5, she performed at the National Theatre with the Christian Action Faith Ministry. It was a gospel rock show where they sang ‘People need the Lord’. She was also a choir leader at Achimota School.She went on to perform at various places, including weddings, churches, and even Miss Teen Personality 2002. She also won an Opera Singing Competition and a song-writing competition for a Fanta song she composed with some friends.

But her career begun with the smash hit – (“Runaway”), which was mostly done in twi, and continued with her tehno/disco-kpalogo number-(“ Keep playing the music”) , predominantly Ga, and now she’s here with another this one she calls “Kabilla”, which she does in Hausa, Twi and English.

I would categories Kabilla as an Afro Soul song. Done in three and a half minutes, the song begins with the heavy sound of grand piano chords which introduce Irene’s voice. I can not go on without mentioning that the texture of Irene’s voice in the first two lines is incredible. Though it is soft and windy, its sweetness and smoothness immediately calls the attention of anyone who knows the sound of “good” music. That is not to say that the other parts of the song are not sung well, no! very far from that, but as you might know, the very beginning of a song is very essential to how it is judged. After Irene has come In to sing the chorus, there’s an interesting one bar hook done by heavy voices which changes the atmosphere of the song and brings a Zulu feel to the listener. Then comes the first and only verse of the song.

About the content of the song, I feel Irene and her lynx crew could have done better. I think there should have been at least a second verse. Or Irene is there another verse? If there is, then I could not notice, probably because the structure of the song is not the usual 2 verse, coda style of Rnb/soul songs. But even if there isn’t a second verse, there’s no law which says there should be two verses in every song. The structure of this song adds to its uniqueness, I guess.

After the verse, the chorus and hook are repeated a couple of times, and the song ended gracefully with Irene’s voice.
I can pass very little comments about the lyrics since I speak no Hausa. But listening to the so-called English version which still carries a lot of Hausa, I hear Irene lamenting to his lover that they’ve come to far to let their fear put them apart. So I guess its about a lady crying over love she thinks she’s about to loose.
All in all, I think it is another brilliant effort by Irene. It falls in the class of those songs usually done by Angelique kidjo and the late Brenda fasie that wins hearts all over the continent and around the music-loving Globe. But if Kabilla would get to these heights, it depends on three things; marketing, marketing and marketing. Not just marketing but a world market centered strategy.

-Cassandra Ntiamoah

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